Too Frozen to be Chosen

What a scripture: Psalm 65:4, Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causest to approach unto thee, that he may dwell in thy courts: we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house, even of thy holy temple.

If you feel that strong compulsion and are drawn in by God’s Spirit to intercede and pray, this scripture says you’re blessed. God chooses and causes us to approach Him. This is a great truth.

“Many are called” Jesus said, “but few are chosen.” If you’re chosen, do not hesitate to answer His call. I believe many have been called, but so few have qualified themselves to be chosen because they have not answered that call. They’re too frozen to be chosen!

The Fear Factor

What keeps us frozen? More often than not, fear keeps us frozen from being chosen. Like a proverbial “deer in the headlights” we’re paralyzed by fear. But what kind of fear? For some it’s rejection. They fear that when they launch out, they’ll get rejected by their peers, by the popular crowd, or even the world. Jesus said, “if you are ashamed of me, I will be ashamed of you.”

The Great Unknown

Another fear is the unknown. We have no idea sometimes what to expect. When we’re given a vision, or receive a call on our lives, that may be all we know. God doesn’t very often provide us with in depth details of our calling. More often than not, this is a walk by faith and not by sight. If you’re waiting until you have all the answers, you’ll remain frozen by that fear and never become the difference maker God called you to become.

Going All IN

There are many forms of fear, and this post by no means will cover them all, but the last one I want to expose is the fear of commitment. We think this only exists when it comes to personal relationships, but we fear this spiritually as well. A calling on our lives takes sacrifice. It will require a death to self, and a call to become more like Christ and less like the world; a call to go ALL IN!

John the Baptist described it this way; He (Christ) must increase, and I must decrease. Powerful words from a man who knew all to well what it meant to step aside and let Jesus have his ministry. Literally, some of John’s disciples left him and followed after Christ. OUCH!  John knew this wasn’t about his kingdom, but about the Kingdom of God. In fact, his favorite sermon was called, “The Kingdom of Heaven is at Hand!”

In Closing

Of course there are a variety of other factors that may have you frozen; a comfortable life, a cozy career, a love for worldly pleasures, you’re too busy with your own agenda, or the opposite, you’re just too lazy.

Listen, we have work to do and time is short! If God has in fact called you, take that next step and avail yourself to become chosen. And, when you’ve been chosen to approach His Throne! GO BOLDLY! – RDM

The Art of Adding by Subtracting


I protest, brothers, by my pride in you, which I have in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die every day! ~ Apostle Paul (1 Corinthians 15:31 ESV)

I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. ~ Apostle Paul (Galatians 2:20 ESV)

What was Paul’s seeming obsession with death? “Dying daily” and “Crucified with Christ” are very descriptive, and honestly, a little depressing if read out of context. But Paul discovered an important principle of growth and advancement of God’s divine purpose in our lives; in order to bring certain things to life, one must allow a part of themselves to die.

Think about what Christ’s death on Calvary provided the world. Jesus came to “bring life more abundantly” (John 10:10). The only way for this abundant life to come to pass was through His death. We can look at this from a variety of angles, but for the purpose of this post, when we’re willing to let something die, it makes room for God to bring something to life. Jesus vividly illustrated this point when he taught His disciples:

Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit. (John 12:24 KJV)

I don’t pretend to understand exactly how this works, but I know about the law of saturation. Our lives can only handle so much. We juggle priorities, or what we think are priorities, we shift responsibilities, and we struggle to keep up. We lack margin in our lives but margin is where we get rest. Margin is where we create. Margin is where we can add new habits, new discoveries, new insight, and even new relationships. One such relationship that continuously requires cultivating is our relationship with God. But God is not content to dwell in just the margins of our lives.

God refuses to compete with any-ONE or any-THING. This means something has to give; something must die. If you re-read Paul’s first quote above, you’ll find he made this a daily discipline. He “died daily.” Something must be sacrificed daily. It was true in Old Testament days, and still rings true in our personal devotions to God. A part of ourselves must die daily that more of God can be revealed. This is a discipline devoted and devout followers of Christ know well. Like John the Baptist said, “I must decrease, and He must increase.”

So, my question is, what are you willing to allow to die in order to give life to a fresh relationship with God? What part of yourself are you willing to crucify to allow the reality of Christ’s love to flourish and abound in your life? What will you sacrifice daily to make room for more of God in your life?

The beauty of this is, when we allow something to die, God brings something more meaningful and powerful to life in us. And, this my friend, is the art of adding by subtracting.